How Much to Install a Tile Roof?

Roof Installation Contractors

A tile roof adds a rich and elegant look to any residence, while giving it a durable, fire-safe protective layer that is also resistant to bugs and rot. It won't grow mold, stain or lose any of its color as years go by. Tiles are generally made of concrete or ceramic clay, and come in a broad range of designs, from more traditional to ultra modern. Concrete tile is generally warranted for at least 50 times, and a ceramic clay tile roof can be warranted for as much as 75 years or more.

Average Costs

  • Concrete tiles care about $4.50 – $9 a square foot for installing standard-grade, or $7,650 – $19,000 for a basic roof on a single level home with1,700 to 2,100 square feet of roof. It can be $7-$10 or more per square foot for upgraded concrete tiles, or $11,900 – $21,000 or more for 1,700-2,100 square feet.
  • Installing a ceramic clay tile roof starts about $7-$10 a square foot for lower-grade tiles in regular shapes and earth colors, or about $11,900 – $21,000 for a basic 1,700 to 2,100 square foot roof. Custom-glazed colors and custom shaped premium clay tiles can be $10-$30 or more per square foot, or $17,000-$63,000 or more for the same 1,700-2,100 square feet.
  • More difficult installs — a steep sloped roof, multiple stories, skylights and other custom features — can cost more. ImproveNet.com has an online roofing calculator that lets you input details about your roof size and features to get a rough estimated cost for materials and installation.
  • These prices are typically for installation only. Costs vary depending on what's involved, but if you’re removing and disposing of existing asphalt shingles, you can expect around $3-$5 a square foot or $510 – $1,100 for a basic ranch-style property — it can be more depending on the type of existing roofing materials, your location and the how difficult the removal project is.

Roof Installation Companies

What to Include

  • The cost of putting a new roof on your home depends on the shape and size of your roof. A 1,500 square foot property might have a 2,100 square foot roof. So, make sure the roof square footage is measured and calculated properly.
  • Ceramic clay tile is made by firing individual pieces in a kiln, which hardens the raw clay, sets the color glazes and minimizes how porous it is so it accepts less moisture. Concrete tiles can imitate the look of wood, slate or other roofing materials. Whether clay or concrete, roofing tiles can be rounded, like the classic half-barrel shape, or flat.
  • Tiles are not recommended for a roof that has less than an 18-degree slope. Because a tile roof lasts a long time, everything underneath the tile needs to also be high quality and long-lasting.

Other Costs

  • Tile roofs are heavy, so If you're switching to tile from a lighter-weight material, you'll need to have the structure inspected by an engineer and have the roof supports possibly reinforced or replaced, which could add $1,000 -$10,000 or more to the cost.
  • If your home is not very close to the source of the tile, freight costs can add $600 – $1,000 or more to the total price.

Do Your Homework

  • Get estimates from more than one contractor, and ask for references. If one estimate includes repairs or upgrades to your roof structure, check if the other quotes also include it. The National Roofing Contractors Association provides a detailed guide[ for buying a new roof.
  • Visit the Contractor's License Reference site to see if the company is licensed in your state and if they have any complaints registered there. Also, check their rating with the Better Business Bureau.
  • A written contract should include a detailed outline of the work required and materials used, dates within which the project will be done, and a payment schedule. Be sure you understand exactly what is and isn't included.

New Roof Installers

If you need a professional, licensed and insured roofing company to help you with your roof installation needs, call Mikku and Sons Roofing and Repair for your free estimate at (623) 465-1068.